Product use and customer happiness

I just read a great post by David Skok on Managing Customer Success to Reduce Churn. One of the key points I love in his post is that measuring customer engagement does not give you the entire picture of your customer(s)’ happiness with your product, and does not correlate perfectly with expected churn rate. While it’s harder to do, measuring customer outcomes can provide a much better view into how likely a customer is to churn, and how much value/happiness they are getting out of your product.

I noticed this pattern at Boundless quite a bit – a number of our happiest users were minimally engaged with the product. That’s because the product met their needs efficiently in two key areas – price and efficacy. They not only paid less that they thought they would for their learning materials, but they also were able to read and retain their information quickly, without the need to heavily engage with the product. It took a while to figure this out, as we were carefully using analytics to track product usage. And once we saw that happiness and engagement were not highly correlated, but instead outcomes (good grades, efficient studying and the great price point) generated the customer happiness… well, then we were able to double down on the right product features and highlight the best selling points to new potential users.

It’s a great post – check it out!

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Fun social media infographic on student social media attitudes

I came across this smart (and cute) infographic on Edudemic. It pretty accurately reflects how people under 21 think about the different social networks. From my work helping students get Boundless textbooks, I’d have to agree that Facebook is much less important than the image creation/sharing networks of Instagram and Snapchat. I’d probably add Tumblr as another network that matters. Marketers who are trying to build brand with students constantly have to keep on their toes since social changes so quickly!

Student social media attitudes

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On campus marketing

One of the big perks of my new marketing position with Boundless is that I get to work with amazing undergraduate students across the nation. These students are charged with letting people on their campuses know about Boundless and free textbooks. We recently had a great on campus competition, where we motivated our on campus student managers to hit aggressive sign up goals – and a lot of them really did an amazing job! Below is a cool post on the “campus battle” with some great pictures of the action.

http://storify.com/GoBoundless/how-campus-battle-started-a-textbook-revolution

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Some great marketing and mobile links

Lots of good content all of a sudden on both mobile and online marketing. Here are some good ones:

  • Triggered emails have HUGE open and click throughs: Online Media Daily reports on a study that shows that triggered emails (emails that are sent when a user takes a specific action, such as abandons a shopping cart, have a much higher click through than ordinary marketing emails.”Triggered open rates performed at 75.1% higher”
  • I recently posted about email marketing subject line performance. Here are the subject lines email marketers should avoid, and which ones drive good open rates.
  • The best email marketing frequency depends on your industry & users, but in general the more you can do the better.
  • Yup, people are really opening emails on mobile devices these days; Returnpath “reports that mobile open share has increased 300% since 2010, and shows no sign of slowing, with four out of 10 emails sent being read on a mobile device.” Read more.
  • “The iPhone and Android smartphones remain the most popular smartphone platforms for messaging. iOS users account for more than half of those opting into MMS and text-messaging campaigns, compared to 34% coming through Android phones. Those levels are up from 23.6%, and 16%, respectively, in April. BlackBerry accounted for 7% of opt-in messaging.” Read more.
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Should Google be most afraid of Amazon

I found this video interesting; is Amazon the biggest threat to Google? The main reasoning is that fewer people bother to go to Google to search for products; now they just go directly to Amazon. Thus, depriving Google of highly profitable adwords revenue for people with an intent to purchase. This is true for my household, so I thought it was compelling.

Where I found it a little less compelling was on the mobile side, but maybe I’ve just been a late adopter of Amazon’s mobile app. I saw some stats recently about how mobile commerce apps were taking off, but of course I forgot to link to it.

 

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Cool Tablet Owner Stats

What’s the difference between an iPad owner and an Android Tablet or Kindle owner? Well, Mediapost has a great piece quoting some Comscore data that has some of the answers!

Basically, the owners are just as different as the functionality, branding and pricing of the different tablet devices would lead you to believe. For example, Kindle Fire owners are more likely to be female than iPad owners. Not surprisingly, iPad owners skew wealthier than the owners of other tablets.

The following is a chart that I pretty much directly borrowed from the Mediapost article that I linked to above:

Total U.S. Tablet Owners  (June 2012)
Total
Smartphone
Total Tablet iPad Android Tablet Kindle Fire
Gender
   Male

51.9%

50.0%

52.9%

50.9%

43.4%

   Female

48.1%

50.0%

47.1%

49.1%

56.6%

Household Income
   <$25k

12.0%

7.8%

5.5%

11.7%

7.0%

   $25k to <$50k

19.6%

18.1%

14.4%

20.4%

20.9%

   $50k to <$75k

19.3%

19.1%

17.2%

20.0%

21.3%

   $75k to <$100k

15.6%

16.7%

16.6%

15.3%

17.5%

   $100k+

33.5%

38.4%

46.3%

32.5%

33.3%

Source: comScore TabLens and comScore MobiLens, August 2012 via MediaPost( Kindle Fire was excluded from the Android tablet total.)

Happiest Tablet Owners – Surprise!

Who are the happiest tablet owners? No surprise – it’s iPad owners. However, Kindle Fire users reported a higher satisfaction rating than Android tablet owners, and were probably statistically tied with iPad users.

Total Smartphone – 8.1
Total Tablet – 8.6
iPad – 8.8
Android – 8.2
Kindle Fire – 8.7

Why Buy A Particular Tablet?

The article also looked at purchase decisions; why did a person buy a particular tablet over another? The selection of apps and price of tablet led as the most important factors. Other stuff like the brand name and the operating system also mattered. Here is another chart from the report that breaks down which purchase considerations mattered by tablet owner:

Top Purchase Consideration Factors (10-Point Scale; Total U.S. Tablet Owners, Age 13+, U.S.; 3 month
average ending June 2012)
Total Tablet iPad Android Tablet Kindle Fire
Selection of apps available for my tablet

7.7

8.1

7.3

7.5

Price of the tablet

7.7

7.2

7.9

8.1

Brand name of the tablet

7.5

8.0

7.0

7.4

Tablet operating system

7.5

7.8

7.4

7.2

Music and video capabilities

7.4

7.6

7.1

7.4

Recommended by friends/family

6.5

6.7

6.1

6.5

Tablet has same OS as my
phone

6.4

6.6

6.3

6.1

Social networking features

6.2

6.3

6.0

6.3

Recommended by retail salesperson

5.3

5.3

5.3

5.2

Source: comScore TabLens, August 2012 (N.B. Single purpose eBook reader devices are excluded from the “tablet” definition, and
Kindle Fire was excluded from the Android tablet total.)

Finally, here is a cool infographic by Comscore on tablets and what people are using them for.

comScore TabLens: Today’s U.S. Tablet Owner Revealed

comScore TabLens provides an in-depth, monthly view into U.S. tablet ownership and usage - comScore Infographic

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