Fun social media infographic on student social media attitudes

I came across this smart (and cute) infographic on Edudemic. It pretty accurately reflects how people under 21 think about the different social networks. From my work helping students get Boundless textbooks, I’d have to agree that Facebook is much less important than the image creation/sharing networks of Instagram and Snapchat. I’d probably add Tumblr as another network that matters. Marketers who are trying to build brand with students constantly have to keep on their toes since social changes so quickly!

Student social media attitudes

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Email subject line tips

I came across some great tips on crafting the best email subject lines on the Litmus blog here. Of course, testing testing testing is the best way to get good results with any email campaign, but starting with these ideas is a good way to begin the tests from a good place.

And I’m always struggling with subject line length, and found the open rate vs. email subject line length to be cool:

“Subject line lengths and their corresponding open and click rates:

  • 4–15 characters: 15.2% open; 3.1% click
  • 16–27 characters: 11.6% open; 3.8% click
  • 28–39 characters: 12.2% open; 4% click
  • 40–50 characters: 11.9% open; 2.8% click
  • 51+ characters: 10.4% open; 1.8% click”

subject-line-infographic-540x1874

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Some great marketing and mobile links

Lots of good content all of a sudden on both mobile and online marketing. Here are some good ones:

  • Triggered emails have HUGE open and click throughs: Online Media Daily reports on a study that shows that triggered emails (emails that are sent when a user takes a specific action, such as abandons a shopping cart, have a much higher click through than ordinary marketing emails.”Triggered open rates performed at 75.1% higher”
  • I recently posted about email marketing subject line performance. Here are the subject lines email marketers should avoid, and which ones drive good open rates.
  • The best email marketing frequency depends on your industry & users, but in general the more you can do the better.
  • Yup, people are really opening emails on mobile devices these days; Returnpath “reports that mobile open share has increased 300% since 2010, and shows no sign of slowing, with four out of 10 emails sent being read on a mobile device.” Read more.
  • “The iPhone and Android smartphones remain the most popular smartphone platforms for messaging. iOS users account for more than half of those opting into MMS and text-messaging campaigns, compared to 34% coming through Android phones. Those levels are up from 23.6%, and 16%, respectively, in April. BlackBerry accounted for 7% of opt-in messaging.” Read more.
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Mobile emails big for retailers

A company called Knotice is reporting that, during the time around the Thanksgiving holiday, 45% of emails sent by retailers were opened on MOBILE DEVICES!

Yup, my two of my favorite marketing channels, mobile and email, are getting closer and closer…

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Good content marketing slideshow

Check out this great slideshow on how b2c and b2b marketers view content marketing. There is a lot on social media marketing, which makes sense, but also talks a little bit about budget, etc.

A higher level summary is that b2c marketers who get a good return on content marketing

  • Spend a more money on content marketing (makes sense if you are getting a positive roi)
  • Distribute more content on more social networks in more ways
  • Tailor content more frequently
  • Feel good that they are producing engaging content
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Email subject line performance

I came across a very interesting study showing email effectiveness, both by open rate and click through rate, by email subject line. Obviously I experiment a lot with email performance, varying subject line, content, design, etc. But it’s great to see data aggregated across a large number of campaigns.

The study was done by Adestra and is available here. Based on billions of sent messages from b2b companies, the looks at performance of different subject lines. I’m just going to quote from solid Marketingchart write up on the study, as it is very interesting data (the following is a direct quote):

  • Currency symbols: Subject lines containing the £ symbol had a far better-than-average (57.8%) click-to-open rate. Those with $ signs scored above-average in opens (15.7%) and clicks (14.7%), but slightly below-average in click-to-opens (-0.8%). Subject lines containing the € symbol were above-average in opens (2.9%) but below-average in clicks (-8.2%) and click-to-opens (-10.8%). Of course, targeting has a big effect on this – as some symbols may be irrelevant to the recipient.
  • Discount terms: These generally performed below-average. “Sale” was the outlier, above-average in opens (14.4%), clicks (76.5%), and click-to-opens (54.3%). Others such as “% off,” “discount,” “free,” “half price,” “save,” “voucher,” “early bird,” and “2 for 1″ all came in below-average in all 3 metrics, save for “voucher,” which had above-average opens (6.5%). “Early bird” was the worst performer in terms of clicks (-71.6%) and click-to-opens (-67.6%).
  • News terms: These had better success than discount terms. “News” (16.2%), “update” (4.9%), “breaking” (33.5%), “alert” (25.9%), and “bulletin” (12.5%) all saw better-than-average click-to-open rates (as well as clicks and opens), with “newsletter” being the only term to perform below-average in each metric. “Alert” saw the best differential for clicks (78.3%), while “news” did best for opens (30.9%).
  • Content terms: There were more discrepancies in this theme. “Issue” (8.5%) and “top stories” (5.9%) were the only to perform above-average in click-to-opens, although the latter saw slightly below-average open and click rates. “Forecast,” “report,” “whitepaper,” and “download” all saw below-average performance in each of the 3 metrics. “Research,” “interview,” and “video” scored above-average for opens, but below-average for clicks and click-to-opens.
  • Benefit terms: “Latest” was the only to see above-average clicks (8.8%) and click-to-opens (9%), while “special,” “exclusive,” and “innovate,” while performing about average in opens, fared far more poorly in clicks and click-to-opens.
  • Event terms: Each of these terms performed below-average in opens, clicks, and click-to-opens. The terms examined were: “exhibition,” “conference,” “webinar,” “seminar,” “training,” “expo,” “event,” “register,” and “registration.” The worst offender for click-to-opens was “webinar” (-63.5%).
  • Multichannel terms: Facebook (21.6%) and Pinterest (16.4%) were the only terms to score above-average in clicks and click-to-opens, though both showed below-average performance in opens. On the flip side, “app” and “iPad” were above-average in opens, and below-average in clicks and click-to-opens. Both “Twitter” and “LinkedIn” were below-average in all 3 metrics.

Some of the take aways are likely to be correct for many email marketers, regardless of industry. The low performance of words like “webinar” and discount terms is probably something most marketers will see with their email campaigns. But it’s pretty hard to say that currency symbols will perform for everyone.

I guess the usual summary is that it makes sense to aggressively test all of this!

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